Exhibiting the arts of Africa in museum spaces today is not a straightforward endeavor, but one could argue it never has been. To wit, in 1997 T.O. Beidelman begins his review of the Africa95 Festival exhibitions by highlighting issues that factor into public displays of African art, including “regional and ethnic bias, questions of authenticity, hostility to modernism, definition of what is art, contestation over ownership of cultural properties, and commercial opportunism.”1 Any of those could easily be applied to exhibitions and publications on the subject today. As part of ever-expanding conceptions of what constitutes “African art,” academics and museum professionals alike still face the discordant roots of political and social issues listed by Beidelman, and strive to reach beyond them in scholarship, collecting, and modes of display.2 One curatorial approach in recent decades has been to blur the long-held artificial distinction between North Africa and the rest...

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