Available on JSTOR at: doi.org/10.2307/3336069

Abstract

As the eldest son of the late Oba, Prince Akenzua had earlier been invested as the Edaiken of Benin (see Part 1 of this series, November 1983), a title that officially acknowledged his right to the throne. As Edaiken, or Crown Prince, he ruled over Uselu, a community outside Benin City that in almost every way replicated in extreme miniature the one he would inherit as king. During his apprenticeship the Edaiken learned the elusive art of statecraft, and he was also ritually strengthened to take on the burdens that lay ahead of him. It was during his tenure at Uselu that he also performed the funeral obsequies for his father, the late Oba Akenzua II (see Part 2, February 1984), thus opening the way for his coronation in March 1979 as Erediauwa, thirty-eighth Oba of Benin.