Abstract

Expanding on Ron Athey's legacy of exposing the holiness of his body in body art performances, and on Julianna Snapper's training as an opera singer, Judas Cradle evokes relations of desire, connection, and repulsion. Holy Body takes off from the queer ethics proffered by Judas Cradle through a rapturous and sometimes pained interpretive hysteria directed toward affirming the erotic ethics implicit in the piece.

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