Abstract

Monuments and exhibits commemorating the 1692–93 witch trials of Salem, Massachusetts, reveal paradigms of economic, performative, and social reproduction. This approach to the public history of the witch tourist district investigates contemporary assurance that acts (or spells) do not do, taking up tourist sites and souvenirs in “Witch City.”

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