The last years of Western Europe's postwar golden decades were, as Piers Ludlow and the contributors to European Integration and the Cold War remind us, transformative. Much changed between 1965, when Charles de Gaulle launched his insurgency against U.S. leadership of the West, and late 1973, when the oil crisis signaled the dusk of Europe's twenty-year postwar boom. During this 1965–1973 period the members of the European Economic Community opted for expansion and integration over de Gaulle's concept of a security order based on the primacy of national interests. In these years, too, the Atlantic alliance coalesced around a common strategy for East-West détente, a choice that inaugurated a lengthy thaw in Cold War tensions and led to the Helsinki Final Act of 1975.

Historians have not yet satisfactorily explained the complex politics of European international relations in these decisive years. This omission, Ludlow and his collaborators suggest, may well...

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