Medicine and the Saints is an intriguing and innovative study of colonialism in Morocco that explores an array of “medical encounters” between the Moroccan state and the French colonial administration (2). The bulk of the book narrates the period from pre-Protectorate Morocco in the late nineteenth century until 1956, the year of Morocco’s independence. Amster challenges the view that colonial modernity displaced Islamic epistemology and indigenous approaches to healing and replaced them with a liberating and egalitarian positivist knowledge and medical science. Instead, she suggests, Moroccans digested “the experience of French colonialism and its forms of modernity” (5), ultimately elaborating a modern knowledge system to understand health and healing that “expresses different and layered ways of knowing” (209). This book offers a careful and engaging exploration of the negotiations between French and Moroccan knowledge systems.

Amster employs a wide range of disciplinary approaches and analyzes an impressive variety of primary...

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