A number of collections have shown how a spatial perspective and, more specifically, the technology for spatial analysis and visualization can be applied to the study of society and culture. The six essays in this volume all make use of geographic information system (gis) technology and all are concerned with tracing change over time. The articles’ reliance on this technology supports the claim that the spatial humanities as a field are defined by the use of geographical technologies (xv). Nevertheless, the more fundamental development is the interest in bringing a geographical perspective to bear on historical change. Combining basic kinds of geographical information—location (where something happens) and distance (the relationship of that location to other locations)—with human events creates new insights. Without doubt, gis has been integral to this development because it has made cartography so easy. Gregory’s bibliography of further readings offers a broad perspective and a...

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