This edited volume contains eleven chapters about aspects of English demographic and economic history. The title promises a long view, and the content delivers. Beginning with reflections on the intellectual legacy of Hajnal’s famous essay on marriage, the collection presents new estimates of the population density of England by county and examines the individual legacy of location for mortality.1 The core and backbone of this book, however, is welfare. The chapters compare welfare in northern Europe with that of southern Europe, and analyse it in England as well—welfare for the elderly, “indoor” versus “outdoor” relief, poor corporations, and almshouses. The book concludes with a robust comparative treatment of serfdom in England and Russia, a detailed study of peasant mentality via a choice/constraint framework, and a close look at the effect of English “individualism” on business formation (and demise).

Highlights are Bruce M. S. Campbell and Lorraine Barry’s geographical analysis...

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