Tarrow follows in the footsteps of Tilly, Mann, and his own prior research to develop the connection between war, state-building, and domestic contentious politics.1 In this book, Tarrow highlights the theoretical links between contentious politics and war. Dissension may occur during the mobilization phase as the state mobilizes soldiers, requisitions supplies, or marshals public opinion to support the war. Protest may also erupt during the war, if citizens rebel against conscription, as in the French Revolution and the U.S. Vietnam war, or if a citizenry seizes the opportunity to overthrow the state.

Contentious politics can also shape the aftermath of a war, when a state extends or constricts civil rights. Tarrow usefully considers the complex relationship between war and civil rights. In this context, the comparative scope of his argument bears the most fruit, as he shows that the relationship between war and civil rights is mediated by contentious...

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