This book is the second one that Hayhoe has devoted to the history of Burgundy in the eighteenth century. In the prior one, he scrutinized the seigneurial courts of justice, whereas in this one, he launches an inquiry into the mobility of villagers and into the ways in which communities of Northern Burgundy—currently the department of Côte d’Or—dealt with the issues created by migrations.1

Hayhoe engages with the work of the entire community of historians focusing on migration, such as Croix, Collins, and especially Poussou, who defended the idea of a micro-mobile pattern—with distances shorter than 10 km—to characterize the nature of migration in old regime France.2 Yet, Hayhoe provides a wide range of evidence that this society’s mobility was extensive in some sense. For instance, he underlines that two-fifths of the adult residents of rural communities did not live in their birthplace, and thanks to a few...

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