For twenty years, Price has been honorably and doggedly trawling for evidence of the “weaponization” of anthropology in World War II and the Cold War, making especially good use of the Freedom of Information Act but also performing the traditional functions of the good historian in archives, memoirs, oral histories, and the technical literature. Cold War Anthropology, his third book on the subject, is his magnum opus. It is not, and could not be, complete. The cia still keeps too many secrets in various archives, and too much of its covert skulduggery has left little trace, having been performed off the books by private contract or with a wink and a nod. Nevertheless, Price’s range is encyclopedic and his reach very deep.

The book contains some familiar, perhaps over-familiar, stories: for instance, the cia’s ties to Harvard’s Russian Research Center and to mit’s Center for International...

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