This exciting, informed global history covering a great span of time and place will appeal to scholars who want a survey text about war and society after 1500 that is firmly non-Eurocentric; its points of detail and interdisciplinary methodologies will interest specialists. Although the book under review is a history, it draws from geography, sociology, anthropology, and economics, not least by way of Sandberg’s use of a variety of methodological approaches to explore the complex dynamics of early modern warfare. These approaches pivot on “military revolutions” and technology diffusion, “encounters”

Sandberg challenges the accepted periodization that world wars emerged only after the French and industrial revolutions, instead placing the early modern period center-stage for our understanding of war as a global, cultural phenomenon and arguing persuasively that war had transformed as such by 1700. War accompanied European cultural and economic expansion; only mountainous inland areas escaped the direct touch of...

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