This collection of nine essays about immigrants’ transnational engagements in their home countries covers a wide range of groups—Italians, Portuguese, Mexicans, Japanese, Chinese, Arabs, Jews, and Indians—in different countries/world regions examined in different time spans. The book is divided into two parts, one devoted to the role of sender and receiver states in shaping immigrant transnational pursuits, and the other to the importance of the temporal contexts of these engagements for the forms that they assume and the directions in which they evolve.

In the introduction, the editors announce the collection’s fourfold contributions: (1) to provide a better understanding of a heretofore under-investigated role of sending and receiving states in triggering or constraining immigrants’ transnational engagements; (2) to offer insight into the changing circumstances and practices of immigrant transnational pursuits throughout a longue durée, which reveals far more complicated historical trajectories for this phenomenon than researchers usually acknowledge; (3)...

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