Since the early 1990s, and the publication of Hall’s and Usner’s pioneering books on colonial Louisiana, the French colony has attracted the attention of a rising number of historians of early America.1 One reason for this interest is the availability of rich primary sources. Historians of French Louisiana thought that they had located all of the existing documentation, but the re-discovery and purchase of the travel account written by Marc-Antoine Caillot—a clerk in the service of the Company of the Indies in New Orleans between 1729 and 1731—by the Historic New Orleans Collection in 2004 was a pleasant surprise. Although scholars could already rely on the travel accounts of a few military officers, a ship’s captain, a nun, or a director of the Company’s plantation, Caillot’s memoir offers an original perspective on French Louisiana society because of the author’s background, profession, culture, and style.

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