According to the introduction, abundance in this edited volume refers to the large numbers of particular objects found in archaeological sites, signifying their importance, whether for food, ornamentation, or utilitarian use. Abundance became a sign of ritual cohesion; it was not only a social marker but also a distinguishing feature of social stratification. The highest ranks in society displayed their power through largesse and iconography.

The ten chapters in this volume cover a broad spectrum of topics about a wide variety of forager and farming societies, as well as historical empires. The data discussed in them show the ways in which abundance can be documented in the archaeological record. Maria Nieves Zedeño examines new research that attempts to measure various kinds of wealth in relation to bison abundance along the Rocky Mountain foothills. Her chapter is particularly informative about the issue of ritual bundles. Christopher Moore and Christopher Schmidt examine...

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