Imperial Bodies in London begins at the end of its subjects’ careers, when colonial officials returned to “native soil … to recuperate their health and reconnect with friends and family” (3). By the late nineteenth century, travel on steamships through the Suez Canal shortened the duration of these return voyages, allowing exhausted imperial officials to return home to seek rehabilitation from illnesses of empire. Following the movement of these “returners” from the colonies, Hussey examines how increased mobility of people and the knowledge that they brought with them influenced medical practice and research in London, while also reinforcing colonial power structures.

Using the human body as a framework, Hussey seeks to extend the theory established by Arnold and expanded by Collingham that the body was “central to the colonial experience” even as it “traversed tropical and temperate environments” (12).1 Thus, each chapter of Imperial Bodies in London focuses on...

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