Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, one could easily forget that more than 37 million people continue to suffer with a disease caused by another virus that has killed even more people since its discovery in 1981. Human immunodeficiency virus (hiv), which can cause death through acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (aids) and a variety of opportunistic infections, still infects 4,000 adults and children daily; 60 percent of those infections occur in Sub-Saharan Africa, despite advances in hiv prevention and treatment.1 Without medication, hiv/aids is a death sentence. In 2000, only 50,000 people were on anti-retroviral treatment (art) in Africa. In 1996, when art became available in the United States, the feasibility of an art program across Africa was still in doubt. Now, more than 27.5 million people are on lifesaving treatment, including 20 million in Sub-Saharan Africa.2

How we arrived from 50,000 to...

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