This volume offers new perspectives on medicine and slavery in the Atlantic World. Overall, the editors’ goal is to recover the voices and actions of black and indigenous peoples through “reading [texts] against the grain” of texts often produced for a different purpose by whites. The geographical scope of these chapters is deliberately wide, moving across time and space in an attempt to break through the various partitions of slavery studies. Thus, the first three chapters under the heading “Knowledge” draw as much from anthropological and archaeological sources as they do from more traditional historical texts. In a consideration of indigenous/African healing and magical rituals on the island of Hispaniola, Lauren Derby resurrects the Taino, the island’s indigenous people long considered extinct by historians. She finds their healing stones and magical caves survived via mixture with African slave-healing rites.

Likewise, Chelsea Berry and Mary E. Hicks look at African attitudes...

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