This sophisticated, multidisciplinary study of commercial print representations of monarchy between 1649 and 1760 provides food for thought about what successful accounts of political practices might look like now that the “cultural turn” has run its course. Koscak situates the representations under study in a historically specific structural environment that provided the material conditions for their production—an expanding commercial market for domestically sourced print engravings. Koscak’s aim is to describe and account for the cultural practices of a “loyalist” bent that emerged in this environment. The book’s analysis is also grounded in an awareness that the representations under study were simultaneously material and semiotic in nature. Koscak’s approach, which she explicates in the introduction, helps her to show how the consumers could re-purpose engravings with their own representational, reverential, and devotional ends in mind but as conditioned by those objects’ material and semiotic characteristics.

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