It gives me great pleasure to see this journal honoring Suzanne Corkin for her substantial contributions to cognitive neuroscience. Suzanne Hammond (now, Corkin) was my second graduate student at the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI), where she overlapped with Doreen Kimura. Sue had come to McGill from Smith College, and one day, she arrived in my laboratory with a strongly expressed wish to work on somesthesis. This somewhat unexpected choice delighted me because it filled a gap in our ongoing program, which up to then had dealt primarily with the visual and auditory functions of the temporal lobes. The topic of somesthesis also fit well with the interests of Dr. Theodore Rasmussen, who by then had succeeded Wilder Penfield as director of the MNI. Rasmussen believed, contrary to the current view at the time (Evans, 1935), that an excision from the...

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