Abstract

As a response to the critics of feminist science studies I argue that it is possible to formulate empirical hypotheses about gender ideology in the practice of the physical sciences without (1) reinforcing stereotypes about women and mathematical sciences or (2) assuming at the outset that the area of physics under investigation is methodologically suspect. I will then critically evaluate two case studies of gender ideology in the practice of the physical sciences. The case studies fail to show that gender ideologies have influenced the practice of the physical sciences in a profound way—not because it is impossible to conceive how gender ideologies could influence the practice of the physical sciences even in a profound way—but because they do not provide the right kind of evidence. This, however, leaves open the possibility that future studies might provide such evidence.

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