Recent immersive mixed reality (MR) and virtual reality (VR) displays enable users to use their hands to interact with both veridical and virtual environments simultaneously. Therefore, it becomes important to understand the performance of human hand-reaching movement in MR. Studies have shown that different virtual environment visualization modalities can affect point-to-point reaching performance using a stylus, but it is not yet known if these effects translate to direct human-hand interactions in mixed reality. This paper focuses on evaluating human point-to-point motor performance in MR and VR for both finger-pointing and cup-placement tasks. Six performance measures relevant to haptic interface design were measured for both tasks under several different visualization conditions (“MR with indicator”, “MR without indicator”, and “VR”) to determine what factors contribute to hand-reaching performance. A key finding was evidence of a trade-off between reaching motion confidence” measures (indicated by throughput, number of corrective movements, and peak velocity) and “accuracy” measures (indicated by end-point error and initial movement error). Specifically, we observed that participants tended to be more confident in the “MR without Indicator” condition for finger-pointing tasks. These results contribute critical knowledge to inform the design of VR/MR interfaces based on the application's user performance requirements.

This content is only available as a PDF.

Article PDF first page preview

Article PDF first page preview
You do not currently have access to this content.