Abstract

Female entrepreneurs may be less networked than their male counterparts and so derive less benefit from agglomeration. They may also have greater domestic burdens and therefore have higher commuting costs. This paper develops a theoretical model showing that either of these forces can lead to the segregation of male- and female-owned businesses, with female entrepreneurs choosing locations farther from agglomerations and commuting shorter distances. Empirical analysis is consistent with these predictions. Female-owned businesses are segregated, often to a degree similar to black-white residential segregation. Female-owned enterprises are less exposed to agglomeration, with 10% to 20% less own-industry employment nearby.

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