Chris Dubbs broadly depicts thirty-eight American newswomen's actions and published World War I coverage to argue that they “put a feminine stamp on what had always been seen as the masculine pursuit of war correspondence” (xviii). Unladylike vividly recreates the women's war experiences in neutral nations, revolutionary Russia, and within the conflict's European and Middle Eastern fronts. Dubbs’ vignettes—including Mary Boyle O'Reilly's profile of war-afflicted Belgian civilians, Mary Brush's interview with a patronizing Russian finance minister, and Rheta Childe Dorr's reportage on female Russian soldiers and encounters with sexism in France—exhibit how American female reporters’ war itineraries diverged from those of their male peers. Dubbs’ extensive treatment of his subjects—a welcome departure from androcentric journalistic discussions—drafts a plausibly sound foundation for this claim.

Yet Unladylike’s sheer breadth blunts its thesis. Lavishly situating American female journalists’ war writings—some featured in a forthcoming Dubbs-curated anthology of women's reporting—supplants salient archival and...

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