Kate Masur's Until Justice Be Done not only provides an exceptionally important and timely contribution to nineteenth-century American historiography but also supplies readers with a broader, deeper understanding of the history of racial ideas and practices in the United States. Her deeply researched, vividly told story of Black and white Americans’ courageous struggle to realize the ideals proclaimed in the Declaration of Independence can be both inspiring and discouraging. Building on the work of generations of scholars, Masur investigates the ways white people's prejudices throughout the nation created customs and laws that discriminated powerfully against free African Americans while concurrently securing slavery in states where white voters chose to maintain the not-so-peculiar institution. Masur shows us how growing numbers of activists pushed against this rising tide of white supremacy, convincing increasing numbers of voters to support equal civil rights. Ultimately, their efforts would carry the free soil Republican party into...

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