Abstract

The “mill girls” of Lowell relished their opportunities for reading, writing, and dressing in stylish clothes. In their magazine the Lowell Offering (1840–45), the workingwomen used their growing reputations for literariness and fashionability to scrutinize the differences between themselves and the ladylike models they were expected to emulate.

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