Abstract

Since 19 April 1775, Lexington and Concord have been fused in Americans’ cultural memory. Yet Lexington was no Concord. The towns’ social, demographic, political, religious, and ideological differences shed light on their radically different responses to imperial crises as well as on the shared motivations that prompted both—ultimately—to take up arms.

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