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Table 1

Steps of the create Process

StepActivities
Consider 
  • Concept map introduction

  • Review main concepts

  • Relate old and new knowledge

  • Define knowledge gaps for review

 
Read 
  • Look up vocabulary, paraphrase key sentences

  • Annotate figures

  • Represent table data in graphical form

  • Sketch “what went on in the lab or field” for each experiment

 
Elucidate hypotheses or research questions 
  • Retitle each figure in your own words

  • Use the sketch of the study to derive question being asked or hypothesis being addressed

 
Analyze and interpret data 
  • Use templates as a framework for interpreting data

  • Learn to cope with jargon of scientific writing

  • Determine the organization/logic of each experiment

  • Discuss data in class

  • Write bullet points for your own discussion

  • Write your own title for the paper

 
Think of the next experiment 
  • Design and sketch two different follow-up studies for a given paper

  • Pitch your experiment to a student grant panel

  • Compare/debate/defend various proposed experiments

 
Engage with authors or experts 
  • Students brainstorm questions to ask

  • Faculty member edits list, sends single survey once to each author or expert

  • Students annotate, reflect on, and discuss responses

 
Source: Adapted from Sally G. Hoskins and Leslie M. Stevens, “Learning our L.I.M.I.T.S.: Less Is More In Teaching Science,” Advances in Physiology Education 33 (1) (2009). 
StepActivities
Consider 
  • Concept map introduction

  • Review main concepts

  • Relate old and new knowledge

  • Define knowledge gaps for review

 
Read 
  • Look up vocabulary, paraphrase key sentences

  • Annotate figures

  • Represent table data in graphical form

  • Sketch “what went on in the lab or field” for each experiment

 
Elucidate hypotheses or research questions 
  • Retitle each figure in your own words

  • Use the sketch of the study to derive question being asked or hypothesis being addressed

 
Analyze and interpret data 
  • Use templates as a framework for interpreting data

  • Learn to cope with jargon of scientific writing

  • Determine the organization/logic of each experiment

  • Discuss data in class

  • Write bullet points for your own discussion

  • Write your own title for the paper

 
Think of the next experiment 
  • Design and sketch two different follow-up studies for a given paper

  • Pitch your experiment to a student grant panel

  • Compare/debate/defend various proposed experiments

 
Engage with authors or experts 
  • Students brainstorm questions to ask

  • Faculty member edits list, sends single survey once to each author or expert

  • Students annotate, reflect on, and discuss responses

 
Source: Adapted from Sally G. Hoskins and Leslie M. Stevens, “Learning our L.I.M.I.T.S.: Less Is More In Teaching Science,” Advances in Physiology Education 33 (1) (2009). 
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